Worker at Chemical Plant Killed by Phosgene Exposure

Chemical plant employers and managers have the responsibility of ensuring that employees who dedicate their lives working for them are protected from exposure to dangerous levels of chemicals, gases, and other toxic materials. Most of these components are harmless if handled in certain quantities, with specific protection, after receiving adequate training, and when following proper procedures.

A recent startribune.com article discusses the death of a West Virginia chemical plant employee. After being exposed on January 23, 2010 to phosgene, a major industrial chemical that is poisonous at room temperature, the worker died the next day. As a result, the chemical plant has shut down while the federal Occupation Health and Safety Administration investigates a series of leaks, three of which were reported over the weekend and one of which went unnoticed for a full week. A plant spokesman said that the plant is reviewing operating procedures and that there is no immediate plan to start-up production.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, phosgene poisoning varies based on the amount of phosgene that a person is exposed to, the route of exposure, and the length of time in which an individual is exposed. Serious damage can be done to the eyes, nose, skin, throat, and lungs from phosgene gas and liquid exposure.

Although this particular work-related incident occurred in West Virginia, similar accidents may also take place in the state of Pennsylvania. When an employee is injured while at work, whether due to chemical exposure or an accident of some kind, a Central Pennsylvania hurt at work attorney can be of assistance.

At Anapol Weiss, our skilled and knowledgeable lawyers have been helping injured workers and family members of wrongful death victims receive compensation for damages, their losses, and financial expenses brought about by such unexpected tragedy. Call Anapol Weiss today for a free consultation of your work injury or chemical exposure case.

Source report: http://www.startribune.com/business/82604807.html?elr=KArks:DCiUUUUr

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