Is a Car with No Airbags Safer than a Car with Faulty Airbags?

Is a car with no airbags safer than a car with faulty airbags? Japanese automakers believe so, according to Huffington Post.

Following a massive airbag recall of millions of vehicles with potential airbag malfunction problems, auto makers in Japan advised they will turn off the airbags in the affected vehicles.

Drivers can bring the recalled vehicles back to the dealer and have the airbags “turned off” until the replacement part is ready. This action is meant as a temporary remedy to a defect that can cause some airbags to rupture in the event of a crash and shoot shrapnel at drivers and passengers.

Drivers can bring the recalled vehicles back to the dealer and have the airbags “turned off” until the replacement part is ready. This action is meant as a temporary remedy to a defect that can cause some airbags to rupture in the event of a crash and shoot shrapnel at drivers and passengers.

Honda, Ford, Toyota, Nissan, BMW, CM, Acura, Mazda, Lexus and Pontiac vehicles received the faulty airbag inflators from auto supplier Takata Cororation. The airbag inflator, which is a metal canister inside the airbags, could potentially explode and cause airbag injuries.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is aware of six instances involving this airbag rupture defect. Three of these reports involve airbag injury.

Automakers believe they are reducing the risk of airbag injuries by removing the faulty airbags, but they could be leaving people vulnerable in the event of a crash. Airbags reduce frontal crash related deaths by 32 percent, according to an article in Business Week.

You should not have to risk injury or death to avoid airbag malfunction. Safety should not be sacrificed because of a company’s mistake. Contact an airbag lawyer to discuss your rights regarding the airbag recall.

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