Memorial Day is the unofficial start to summer.  It is also one of the deadliest holidays for drivers and passengers. Car accident injuries claimed 397 lives during the 2010 Memorial Day weekend, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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As part of the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, the United States government created the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The VICP is a no-fault alternative to the traditional tort system for processing vaccine injury compensation requests. Continue Reading

Oxygen deprivation at birth, also known as perinatal hypoxia, is one of the leading causes of infant brain damage, according to Springer International Publishing. Between 2 and 10 out of every 1,000 babies experience a lack of oxygen at birth, according to the American Journal of Neuroradiology.

In some cases, a baby may experience perinatal anoxia – the total absence of oxygen.

Not getting enough oxygen during or after birth can cause long term neurological injuries. Both perinatal hypoxia and perinatal anoxia can result in an injury called hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).  Many newborns with HIE will die as a result of organ failure or lung infections.  Babies who survive will experience lifelong problems that may include seizures, developmental delay and cerebral palsy. Continue Reading

April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, and many organizations are joining in the effort to spread knowledge about dangerous habits on the roadways. But for Philadelphia personal injury lawyer Joel Feldman, dedicating a day to teaching young drivers about the consequences of driving while distracted is just another day.

Joel Feldman, a shareholder at the prominent Pennsylvania injury law firm Anapol Weiss, founded End Distracted Driving (EndDD.org) after his daughter Casey was killed by a distracted driver in 2009.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with the assistance of the Department of Health and Human Services, American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Academy of Pediatrics published a set of guidelines for parents who chose not to vaccinate their children.

If You Choose Not to Vaccinate Your Child, Understand the Risks and Responsibilities” provides important safety tips on how to protect your child and others from vaccine-preventable diseases, including measles.

Some parents decline vaccination because of religious reasons, but a growing number of parents are concerned about potential vaccine injuries, such as Guillain Barre syndrome from a flu shot.

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The recent measles outbreak has sparked a debate about vaccine injuries and the safety of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR). Vaccine adverse reactions can occur, but most MMR vaccine reactions are rare and minor, according to an Institute of Medicine (IOM) study.

The vast majority of children do not experience anything worse than short-lived redness or itching at the injection site, Scientific American reported.

Children who receive the MMR vaccine have a one in 3,000 chance of developing a fever that leads to a seizure, according to IOM. Such seizures should not lead to any permanent neurological damage and actually occur less frequently than seizures caused by the itself. Continue Reading

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced that AndroGel manufacturers would be required to add heart attack and stroke risks to the drug’s warning label, but AndroGel lawsuits are already underway.

Lawyers began filing testosterone lawsuits last year on behalf of men who suffered a heart attack or stroke while taking prescription testosterone. There are 14 manufacturers in the two-billion-dollar market. In June 2014, a centralized Testosterone multidistrict litigation (MDL) was established in Chicago so that testosterone lawsuits involving all 14 manufactures could be filed in one place. Continue Reading

Young adults born with cleft lip or cleft palate birth defects may be able to seek justice by filing a Zofran lawsuit.

GlaxoSmithKline’s (GSK) anti-nausea drug was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1991 to treat nausea and vomiting related to cancer treatments. Doctors also prescribed Zofran to treat morning sickness, but the drug was never approved for pregnant women.

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The Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyers at Anapol Weiss have seen firsthand the devastating effects of a medical misdiagnosis. Failure to diagnose serious conditions such as cancer, pneumonia or meningitis can be result in a death that may have otherwise been prevented.

A patient is not to blame when a condition is misdiagnosed. It is the doctor’s responsibility to provide a correct diagnosis. However, there are a number of steps a patient can take to decrease the chances of becoming another victim of medical malpractice.

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